Questions for a computer vision scientist: Serge Belongie Interview from Kaptur: We caught up with Serge Belongie,  co-organizer and judge for the upcoming Entrepreneurial Computer Vision Challenges, part of theLDV Vision Summit, to learn more about him, the competition and computer vision. - First, a little bit about you. What is your background ? I’m currently a professor of Computer Science at Cornell University’s newly created NYC Tech campus.  I visited here for the inaugural “beta semester” in spring of 2013 and I liked it so much I decided to join full-time.  Before moving to Cornell I was a professor in the Computer Science & Engineering department at UC San Diego, which I joined in 2001 after completing my PhD at Berkeley.  My main research areas are Computer Vision and Machine Learning.  In parallel with my work in academia I’ve been involved with several startup companies in the areas of fingerprint biometrics, vehicle recognition and personal photo album organization. - Besides recognizing people and objects in images, what practical applications can we expect from computer vision and machine learning ? Recognition of text in images is something that will dramatically improve the quality of life for blind individuals.  Optical Character Recognition (OCR) on scanned document images has been a mature technology for quite some time, but recent advances in Computer Vision and Machine Learning technology have extended the scope of OCR to include unconstrained photos of everyday scenes ranging from subway stops to grocery store shelves to restaurant menus. - - Tell us more about your involvement with the LVD Vision Summit . Why did you decide to collaborate on the event ? When I first moved to NYC I was introduced to Evan by our mutual friend Karen Moon, founder of fashion & beauty analytics company Trendalytics.  Evan invited me to a dinner with a group of NYC based entrepreneurially minded people working in tech and I was inspired by the sense of community he cultivated within his extended network. When Evan proposed the idea of a summit I thought it was a great idea, very much in line with Cornell Tech’s role in bolstering the tech community in NYC. Read full interview at Kaptur

Questions for a computer vision scientist: Serge Belongie

Interview from Kaptur:

We caught up with Serge Belongie,  co-organizer and judge for the upcoming Entrepreneurial Computer Vision Challenges, part of theLDV Vision Summitto learn more about him, the competition and computer vision.

- First, a little bit about you. What is your background ?

I’m currently a professor of Computer Science at Cornell University’s newly created NYC Tech campus.  I visited here for the inaugural “beta semester” in spring of 2013 and I liked it so much I decided to join full-time.  Before moving to Cornell I was a professor in the Computer Science & Engineering department at UC San Diego, which I joined in 2001 after completing my PhD at Berkeley.  My main research areas are Computer Vision and Machine Learning.  In parallel with my work in academia I’ve been involved with several startup companies in the areas of fingerprint biometrics, vehicle recognition and personal photo album organization.

- Besides recognizing people and objects in images, what practical applications can we expect from computer vision and machine learning ?

Recognition of text in images is something that will dramatically improve the quality of life for blind individuals.  Optical Character Recognition (OCR) on scanned document images has been a mature technology for quite some time, but recent advances in Computer Vision and Machine Learning technology have extended the scope of OCR to include unconstrained photos of everyday scenes ranging from subway stops to grocery store shelves to restaurant menus. -

- Tell us more about your involvement with the LVD Vision Summit . Why did you decide to collaborate on the event ?

When I first moved to NYC I was introduced to Evan by our mutual friend Karen Moon, founder of fashion & beauty analytics company Trendalytics.  Evan invited me to a dinner with a group of NYC based entrepreneurially minded people working in tech and I was inspired by the sense of community he cultivated within his extended network. When Evan proposed the idea of a summit I thought it was a great idea, very much in line with Cornell Tech’s role in bolstering the tech community in NYC.

Read full interview at Kaptur